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Tag: Chicago

Chicago Gets Additional ATF Agents to Quell Outbreak in Gun Violence

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Chicago is getting seven more ATF agents to help quell an outbreak violence, the Chicago Sun-Times reports.

The decision was made recently by Attorney General Eric Holder, who had met with the Chicago mayor.

The Windy City now has 52 ATF agents.

“They wanted to bring more resources to Chicago to combat some of the gun violence that’s taking place here,” said ATF spokesman Tom Ahern.

“Initially we’ll have four starting out here on the 21st of the month, then we have more coming down the road,” Ahern said.

The decision comes after a bloody Fourth of July weekend in which 13 people were killed and 58 wounded in Chicago.
Ahern said the help is desperately needed.

“We welcome the new agents. We can always use more manpower,” Ahern said. “The ATF’s primary focus is firearms trafficking and stemming the flow of illegal guns into Chicago.”

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Weekend Series on Crime: Chicago Gangs

Robert J. Shields Becomes Head of FBI’s Milwaukee Office

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Robert J. Shields, who began his FBI career as a special agent in Chicago, is the newest head of the FBI’s Milwaukee office.

The Associated Press reports that Shields, who most recently served as chief inspector at FBI headquarters, officially began his job Monday.

He replaces Teresa Carlson, who was moved to Washington last year.

Shields began his career tackling white-collar crime and later handled computer forensics.

Hapless Traveler on Crutches or Drug Peddler? Man Blows Cover with Fake Cast That Contained Kilo of Cocaine

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

At first glance, Daniel Ramirez looked like a hapless taveller on crutches.

But when the 21-year-old was on a train traveling from California to Chicago, DEA task force officers said he looked nervous and suspicious, The Smoking Gun reports.

More alarming, his cast was “uneven in texture, size and shaping not consistent with that of a case applied by a medical professional.”

His cover crumbled – literally – when Ramirez tried to remove his sock, causing the cast to break up.

That’s when agents said they spotted a plastic bag, which contained about a kilo of cocaine.

Ramirez was charged Wednesday with a felony narcotics count.

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Chicago Tribune Editorial: Should ATF Headquarters Be Named for Eliot Ness

Al Capone/fbi photo

By the Chicago Tribune
Editorial Page

Chicago

We all know crime fighter Eliot Ness brought down Chicago mobster Al Capone, right?

Not quite. Ness spent the best years of his life in a hunt to put Capone behind bars, but he had less to do with the final outcome than legend has it. Ness retired from federal law enforcement in his prime, then worked as a public safety official in Ohio. His personal life became a mess and he died at age 54.

Republican Sen. Mark Kirk and Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin are pushing to name the Washington headquarters of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives after Ness. This has prompted a delicious debate about Chicago history during Prohibition.

Alderman Ed Burke, the City Council’s resident historian, has dismissed the famous lawman. “Eliot Ness had a checkered career after leaving the federal government,” Burke said. “I simply do not think his image matches the actual reality of his legacy.”

Read more here

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With Terrorism And Other Crimes, Chicago’s FBI Struggles to Find Resources to Combat Violent Crime in Chicago

Robert Holley

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As the FBI’s Chicago office continues to make terrorism a top priority, the bureau is facing pressure to help quell violence in Chicago, the Chicago Tribune reports.

But Robert Holley, the special agent in charge in Chicago, said his office lacks the staff to adequately combat violent crime. In addition to terrorism, his 850 agents, analysts and support staff,  also are tied up investigating cyberattacks, financial fraud, political corruption and bank robberies. About half of the 850 are actually agents.

Holley pointed out that budget problems mean a hiring freeze.

“We will go after the worst of the worst, and we will go after the gang leadership. That has to be our focus,” said the 18-year FBI veteran, who has met with Chicago police Superintendent Garry McCarthy and plans to speak with Mayor Rahm Emanuel next month. “(But) if I put more resources on violent crime, I’d have to take away from other things… I’m not prepared to accept that risk right now.”

 

Head of Chicago’s FBI Looks For Ways to Help Crack Down on Violent Crimes

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Answering calls to help crack down on Chicago’s violent crime rate, the new head of Chicago’s FBI office said Monday that he plans to find new ways for his agents to lend a hand, the Associated Press reports.

But that won’t be easy.

In one of his first interviews since taking the position about a month ago, Robert Holley said about a quarter of his agents work on violent-crime cases.

“Could I move resources from one investigative branch to another? I could,” said Holley. “But I would have to take away from other programs, and I don’t know if I am willing to accept that risk right now.”

Holley’s background is in terrorism, the AP wrote.

FBI Reports ‘Solid New Leads’ in Mysterious 1966 Kidnapping of Chicago Baby

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The unsolved case of a baby stolen from his mother in Chicago nearly a half century ago is a nagging mystery to many.

Now the FBI says it has “solid new leads” in the 1966 case, ABC News reports.

The parents, Chester and Dora Fronczak, thought they found their son Paul in New Jersey but DNA tests recently revealed they were wrong.

The FBI re-opened the case.

“We’re going to do everything that we can to follow up to see if that baby is out there,” said Bob Shields, the special agent in charge of the Chicago FBI office.