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Head of FBI’s Boston Office to Retire And Join Private Sector After 2 Years at Helm

Vincent Lisi

Vincent Lisi

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The head of the FBI in Boston is retiring after 26 years of service with the agency.

Vincent B. Lisi, who was appointed to run the Boston field office two years ago, plans to join the private sector as a director of security, his spokeswoman told the Boston Globe. 

“Vince has worked tirelessly during his tenure . . . and the district has clearly benefited from his expertise and dogged work ethic,” U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said. “He truly exemplifies public service as evidenced by his long and impressive career.”

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans lauded Lissi for his “help, support and professionalism” in keeping the region safe.

“During his time in Boston, the already strong relationship between the FBI and the BPD only got stronger, and [Lisi] will be missed,” Evans said.

Lisi, who took over the position three months after the Boston Marathon attack, oversaw FBI operations in Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

Details of his job weren’t immediately clear.


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FBI Director James Comey Announces 3 Key Leadership Appointments

Kevin Perkins/FBI photo

Kevin Perkins/FBI photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James B. Comey has made three key leadership appointments, including a new special agent in charge of the FBI Baltimore Division.

Comey made the announcement Thursday.

Kevin Perkins, who served three year as associated deputy director, will take the helm in Baltimore to replace retiring Stephen Vogt.

Mr. Perkins entered on duty as a special agent in January 1986. He previously served in the Kansas City, Philadelphia, and Baltimore Divisions in a variety of investigative and leadership positions. Mr. Perkins previously served as the special agent in charge in Baltimore from January 2004 to February 2006.

Mr. Perkins’ executive leadership positions included serving as assistant director for the Criminal Investigative Division, the Inspection Division, and the Finance Division, where he also served as chief financial officer of the FBI.

Andrew McCabe

Andrew McCabe

Comey also announced that Andrew McCabe, who served as assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office, was named as associate deputy director at FBI headquarters.

McCabe has a host of experience, but primarily has focused on counterterrorism and counterintelligence over the past decade.

McCabe was a lawyer in the private practice before joining the FBI.

Paul Abbate

Paul Abbate

Comey also announced the appointment of Paul M. Abbate as assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office.

Abbate has served as special agent in charge of the Detroit Division since October 2013. He also served much of his time focusing on counterterrorism and was deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.


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DEA Gets New Leader of Philadelphia Field Division; Pledges Fight Against Heroin

Gary Tuggle

Gary Tuggle

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 23-year veteran of the DEA has been named as the next head of the Philadelphia Field Division.

Philly.com reports that Gary Tuggle will oversee the city and five regional officers in Pennsylvania and Delaware, replacing Don Dongilli, who retired last year.

Tuggle’s career began as a Baltimore City police officer before joining the DEA in 1992.

Most recently, Tuggle served as the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA’s Washington Office.

Tuggle said he plans to focus on the heroin and prescription drug epidemic.

Other Stories of Interest


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Ohio Homeland Security Chief Dies After Decades of Helping Residents

Richard Baron

Richard Baron

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Ohio Homeland Security lost its leader.

Richard Baron, executive director of the agency, died Tuesday following an illness, the Columbus Dispatch. 

Baron, 54, of Westerville, headed up security issues since September 2011.

Before taking the top Homeland Security job, Baron served 25 years with the State Highway Patrol and retired as captain in 2012. Prior to his State Highway Patrol job, Baron was a police officer and firefighter.

“He was an inspirational leader … a good man in every sense,” Department of Public Safety Director John Born said of his patrol academy classmate from 1987.


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Top-Ranking Justice Department Official in Criminal Division Leaving for New Job

Marshall Miller

Marshall Miller

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The criminal division of the Justice Department is about to lose one of its top-ranking officials.

The New York Times reports that Marshall L. Miller plans to step down as the criminal division’s second highest in command at month’s end.

The longtime federal prosecutor plans to take a job with New York University with plans to eventually join the private sector.

Miller served as the chief of staff of the criminal division’s leader, Leslie R. Caldwell, overseeing about 600 prosecutors who worked on cases ranging from public corruption to Wall Street misconduct.

“Marshall Miller is an outstanding attorney, a remarkable public servant and an unwavering advocate for the principles of justice,” Attorney General Loretta Lynch said.

Miller plans to join the Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement at the New York University School of Law.


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First Hispanic to Run FBI’s Largest Field Office Keeps Low Profile

Diego Rodriguez

Diego Rodriguez

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Before Diego Rodriguez became the first Hispanic person to run the FBI’s largest field office, he turned down an offer in the late 1980s to join the bureau.

“I’m really happy teaching. Thanks, but no thanks,” he recalled saying, the Associated Press reports.

But Rodriguez eventually decided to join the FBI and began working drug cases.

More than 25 years later, Rodriguez oversees about 2,000 agents working on cases raining from terrorism and insider trading to cyber fraud and public corruption. He is the assistant director in charge of the FBI’s New York office.

Rodriguez has kept a low profile.

“I genuinely care about their cases, but I’m not a micro-manager,” Rodriguez, 50, said in a recent interview in his lower Manhattan office. “They’ve got their own chain of command. The head of the office doesn’t need to be meddling in certain things.”

The Associated Press wrote:

Rodriguez’s modesty is rooted in humble beginnings: He was born in Colombia and moved to New York City with his family as an infant. He spent his childhood in working-class Queens, where his father turned him in to a lifelong soccer fan by taking him to see the legendary Pele play for the New York Cosmos.

After graduating from St. John’s University and teaching middle school Spanish, he made his career switch and landed his first FBI assignment in a taskforce investigating money laundering by South American and Mexican drug rings. Over the years, he held various investigative and supervisory positions in Puerto Rico, Miami and Washington before being appointed in 2010 to head the New York office’s criminal division.

At the time, the division was immersed in the groundbreaking investigation of Wall Streetmagnate Raj Rajaratnam and his multi-billion-dollar Galleon hedge fund. It marked the first time the bureau had turned to a method familiar in mob and drug cases — wiretaps — to capture conversations about insider trading. The wires sunk the talkative and boastful Rajaratnam, who’s serving an 11-year prison term.


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Kevin Oaks, Chief of Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley Sector, Retires

Kevin Oaks

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The head of Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley Sector announced Thursday that he is retiring.

The Monitor reports that Kevin W. Oaks spent his last day on the job Thursday following three decades with the federal agency.

Oaks’ former positions included operations division chief in Washington D.C., chief patrol agent of the Buffalo sector and the commander of the agency’s Tactical Unit.

As chief of the Rio Grande sector beginning in April 2014, Oaks oversaw more than 3,000 agents, nine stations and three traffic checkpoints.


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New Leader Takes Over Busy Yuma Sector of Border Patrol

Anthony Porvaznik

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border Patrol’s busy Yuma Sector has a new leader.

On Tuesday, Anthony Porvaznik was named the Yuma Sector chief patrol agent and was sworn in during a ceremony in which his mission was made clear: “Protect America.”

“I do not expect infallibility nor perfection,” Border Patrol Chief Michael Fisher said during the ceremony, the Yuma Sun reports. “Just that he accomplishes the mission: Protect America. Nothing less.”

The Yuma Sector is one of the busiest sectors of Border Patrol, covering 126 miles.

“This ceremony really brings it home to me,” Porvaznik said. “I was surprised at how much it was going to mean to me.”

Porvaznik replaced outgoing Chief Patrol Officer Steve Martin.


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