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Ex-Fed Prosecutor Alan M. Gershel Who Helped Convicted Detroit Police Chief is Named Head of the Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission

Alan M. Gershel

Alan M. Gershel, a law school professor and ex-federal prosecutor whose high-profile cases included the prosecution of Detroit Police Chief William L. Hart, has been named grievance administrator for the Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission.

The commission is the investigative and prosecutorial arm of the Supreme Court for allegations of attorney misconduct.

“Mr. Gershel has a focused vision for the future, decades of experience successfully managing a team of attorneys, and a reputation for professional integrity that will be a credit to the AGC,” Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert P. Young, Jr.  said in a statement.

Gershel resigned from Cooley Law School last Friday.

Gershel replaces interim administrator John Van Bolt.  Bolt was filling in after administrator Robert Agacinski, was fired earlier this year. Agacinski is suing Young and the Grievance Commission, alleging he was fired for reporting illegal misconduct of commission staff members.

Gershel was one of three prosecutors who convicted Chief Hart in May 1992 for embezzling funds earmarked for undercover operations.  Gershel also helped oversee an FBI sting involving local Detroit judges that resulted in a number of them pleading guilty in the late 1980s.

Gershel, a 1978 graduate of University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, taught at Thomas M. Cooley Law School from 2008-2014. Before that, he worked for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for nearly 30 years, and was chief of the Criminal Division from 1989-2008.

 


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Retired FBI Agent Charles McGinty, Who Went After Public Corruption, Died at Age of 67

Charles McGinty

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Charles McGinty, a retired FBI agent with an impressive resume, died Thursday of unknown causes, NOLA.com reports.

He was 67.

McGinty was supervisor of a public corruption squad in the FBI’s New Orleans office when he retired in 2004.

After retiring, McGinty became a security director for Fidelity Homstead Savings Bank, where he was teaching a class when he collapsed.

McGinty, whose older brother also was an FBI agent, became one of the last agents hired by J. Edgar Hoover.

McGinty investigated public corruption and white-collar crime, and at the time of his retirement, he was finishing up a case that sent two Jefferson Parish judges to prison.


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Edward Reinhold to Head up the FBI’s Knoxville Division

Edward Reinhold

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Edward W. Reinhold has been named special agent in charge of the FBI’s Knoxville Division.

Reinhold most recently served as a section chief for the National Name Check Program in the Records Management Division at FBI headquarters, the FBI said in a press release.

Reinhold joined the FBI in 1987 and was first assigned to the Las Cruces resident agency of the Albuquerque Division.

Ten years later, he was promoted to a supervisory special agent at headquarters in the Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division, where he was responsible for training law enforcement organizations throughout the world in the various CJIS systems and programs, the FBI said.

In 2000, he became a supervisory senior resident agent in Augusta, Ga.

In 2007, he was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the Omaha Division, where he oversaw criminal, cyber, and administrative matters until 2012 when he returned to headquarters.

 


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Head of DEA’s Chicago Office Headed to Washington D.C. for No. 3 Job

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jack Riley, the head of the DEA’s Chicago division, is headed to a top post in Washington D.C., the Associated Press reports.

The 56-year-old, who has shed light on the influence of Mexican cartels on the Midwest, has been named the DEA’s chief of operations. The No. 3 post at the agency means Riley will oversee all DEA activity.

Riley was previously the head of the El Paso office.

He is to begin his new job next month.

A replacement has not yet been named.


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Terry Wade Named Special Agent in Charge of Criminal Division at the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office

FBI Agent Terry Wade

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Terry Wade has been named special agent in charge of the criminal division at the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office, the agency announced Wednesday.

Wade most recently served as section chief of the executive development and selection program in the Human Resources Division at FBI headquarters, a press release said.

Wade began his career with the agency in 1996, and was first assigned to the Helena, Montana office of the Salt Lake City Division. He focused on domestic terrorism cases.

After that, he headed to the Oklahoma City division, where he primarily worked violent crimes and drug and white-collar crime matters.

After that, he was promoted to a supervisor in the Criminal Investigative Division at headquarters. In 2003, he was promoted to supervisory special agent of the Flagstaff Resident Agency of the Phoenix Division.

In 2007, he was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the Albuquerque Division, where he was responsible for the counterterrorism, counterintelligence, cyber, intelligence programs and the crisis management program and SWAT team.

He also served as the deputy on-scene commander in Baghdad, Iraq, from December 2008 to April 2009.

 


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Senior DOJ Lawyer Named to No. 3 Post, Highest-Ever for Openly Gay Official

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A senior Justice Department lawyer who has been a key proponent of President Obama’s initiatives has been named to the department’s No. 3 post, becoming the highest-ranking openly gay official to ever serve the department, the New York Times reports.

Stuart F. Delery is replacing Tony West, who announced his departure last week, and will handle civil rights and environmental cases, among other issues. Delery may be best known for his role in overturning the federal ban on same-sex marriage. “Stuart has helped to strengthen our nation’s security, to protect public health and safety, and to achieve justice in cases of financial fraud and recover billions of dollars for taxpayers,” Mr. Holder said in a statement.

“I can think of no more dedicated, more capable, or more passionate public servant to continue the duties, and uphold the high standards, that defined Tony West’s time in office.”


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FBI Promotes Eric Velez-Villar to Executive Assistant Director of Bureau’s Intelligence Branch

Eric Velez-Villar, FBI photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethwire.com 

 Eric Velez-Villar, a 29-year FBI veteran who has fought organized crime, terrorism and drugs, has been promoted to executive assistant director of the bureau’s intelligence branch, the bureau announced.

Velez-Villar most recently served as assistant for the intelligence directorate.

Velez-Villar joined the FBI in 1985 and began working on organized crime and drugs. In 2000, he relocated to FBI headquarters as a supervisory special agent and worked at the DEA’s special operations unit.

In addition, Velez-Villar worked as assistant special agent for the counterterrorism program in Los Angeles.


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Former FBI Special Agent James P. Mallon Jr. Dies at 66 After Battle with Cancer

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

James P. Mallon Jr., a retired FBI special agent who helped crack down on organized crime, died after a battle with cancer on Friday, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

Mallon was working in Detroit when the FBI tapped him to work in the Organized Crime program in Atlantic City, where he shined.

Mallon “was very instrumental in helping set up an FBI undercover operation that resulted in the indictment and conviction of former Atlantic City Mayor Michael Matthews,” in 1984.

Mallon was born in Philadelphia and earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting. After college, he initially worked as a certified public accountant.

Mallon’s career as an FBI special agent began in 1972. He worked in offices in Buffalo, Newark and Detroit.


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