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Archive for November 27th, 2012

Retired FBI Agent Mark Stephen Jimerson Dies at Age 59

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

 Mark Stephen Jimerson, a retired  FBI supervisory special agent, died last Thursday at his home in Mitchellville, Md., from a brain-related cancer. He was was 59.

In February 1985, Jimerson  was assigned to the FBI’s Tampa office, his first posting in the agency. While in Florida, he studied intensive Russian, according to information provided by the family.

He later went on to the FBI’s San Francisco office and began his career with foreign counter intelligence.

In the spring of 1995, he went to FBI Headquarters in Washington here he helped establish an FBI office in Moscow. He also served as a team leader and senior FBI agent for the first FBI delegation that provided law enforcement training in Russia, according to the family information.

He was also assigned to inter-agency taskforce investigating criminal activities involving Russian and Eastern European immigrants.

From 1997 to 2000, he served as the Assistant Legal Attaché, to the U.S. Embassy in Tallinn, Estonia.

In 2000, he was promoted to Legal Attaché to Ukraine where he served within the U.S. Embassy as Chief of the Office of the Legal Attaché and as primary FBI representative in Ukraine.

In 2002, Jimerson and his family returned to their home in Maryland. He was promoted to Unit Chief of the Office of International Operations from 2005 to 2006, acted as an FBI Liaison Officer in the Office of International Affairs from 2002 to 2004 and again from 2006 to 2008, and lastly as Unit Chief in the Eurasian Unit of the Office of International Affairs, the family wrote in a release.

He retired on June 6, 2008.

Jimmerson was born on Aug.  7, 1953 in Madison, Ill., the son of Louise Jimerson and the late Chance Jimerson. He is survived by his wife of 34 years, Wendy Jimerson; his daughter, Stephania Mahdi; son, Mark E. Jimerson; granddaughter, Yasmeen Mahdi; mother, Louise Jimerson; brothers, Alvin (Zella)Valentine and Victor (JoAnn) Valentine of Madison, Illinois, Willard (Sandra) Valentine of Portland, Oregon, and Terrence Jimerson of Madison Illinois; sisters, Autumn Ann Mitchell of Redondo Beach, CA and Shirlee Sue (Larry) Coleman of Flower Mound, TX; and a host of loving nephews, nieces, family and friends.

Jimerson was the youngest of seven children. He was very active in his youth and participated in plays, choir activities, and track and field, the family said.

In high school he showed promise in his Russian language classes and was encouraged by a Bulgarian priest, teaching at his high school, to continue his studies.

He enlisted in the U.S. Army and graduated with Honors from the Defense Language Institute, serving his country as a Russian Linguist.

He was assigned to the 856th Army Security Agency and was stationed in Germany where he was a Russian Voice Interceptor, the family said.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Russian Studies from Monterey Institute of International Studies.

 

Feds Shut Down 132 Websites for Selling Knockoff Items

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Federal law enforcement authorities seized 132 domain names worldwide because they were selling counterfeit merchandise online, the Associated Press reports.

The Cyber Monday crackdown, which comes during the heaviest online shopping day, was the third annual effort to target knockoff clothes, DVDs and other goods.

Authorities seized the sites after confirming authenticity of products through the copyright holders, the AP wrote.

Sites that were busted now show a banner explaining the seizure, according to the AP.

Court: FBI Didn’t Entrap Indianapolis City Councilman in Bribery Scheme

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 A member of the Indianapolis City Council and former police officer cannot argue he was entrapped by the FBI for accepting bribes from an undercover agent, the 7th Circuit has ruled, Courthouse News Service reports.

Lincoln Plowman came under scrutiny after developing a reputation for “questionable use of the power and influence he had acquired,” the court wrote last week.

An FBI agent posing as a strip club owner gave Plowman $5,000 in cash to help push through necessary licenses and a liquor license, the FBI alleges.

The amount was sufficient enough to constitute inducement, the judge said.

Plowman is appealing his 2010 conviction, which landed him a sentence of more than three years in prison, Courthouse News Services reported.

Justice Department Takes Over Rep. Michael Grimm Investigation

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The Justice Department is leading an investigation to determine if Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., a former FBI agent, violated the law when he solicited campaign cash from foreign nationals in exchange for helping an Israeli obtain a green card, USA Today reports.

The House Ethics Committee voted unanimously to hand the probe over to the Justice Department to investigate.

Grimm, of Staten Island, referred questions to his attorney, William McGinley.

“We appreciate the committee’s decision to defer consideration of this matter while we continue to work with the Department of Justice to favorably resolve the false allegations against Congressman Grimm,” McGinley said in a statement. “Any fair and objective review of all of the facts in this matter will conclude that Congressman Grimm engaged in no wrongdoing. We are confident that the Department of Justice and the Ethics Committee will reach that result.”

Twitter, Facebook Help FBI Track Down Next Wave of Securities Fraud


 
Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 Agents searching for securities fraud rely heavily on social media such as Twitter and Facebook to find inside traders, Reuters reports.

Agents said inside traders use advances in technology and social media to communicate.

“I will tell you technology will play a huge part, social media, Twitter. Any kind of technology that is new and doesn’t exist today, if there is any way to exploit it, these individuals will exploit it,” April Brooks, a special agent in charge of the New York field office of the FBI, told Reuters.

The investigation of insider trading, called “Operation Perfect Hedge,” has netted more than 60 convictions, Reuters reported.

FBI to Search for New Name to Add to ‘Ten Most Wanted’ List

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 With the arrest of Jose “Joe” Luis Saenz from the FBI’s ‘Ten Most Wanted’ List, federal authorities will begin searching for a new name to add to the infamous list, ABC News reports.

Special Agent Scott Garriola, a part of the Los Angeles team that helped arrest Saenz, said “there’s always a sense of accomplishment” in apprehending someone from the most wanted list, ABC News reported.

To replace Saenz, the FBI will accept submissions from all 56 field offices.

The top offenders make the list for “violent crimes, cyber crimes, drug trafficking, crimes against children and international money laundering schemes,” ABC News wrote.

The list is effective because of the media attention it receives. More than a quarter of the criminals on the list get captured, according to ABC News.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

 

Courts Divided Over Searches of Cellphones

 
By SOMINI SENGUPTA
New York Times

Judges and lawmakers across the country are wrangling over whether and when law enforcement authorities can peer into suspects’ cellphones, and the cornucopia of evidence they provide.

A Rhode Island judge threw out cellphone evidence that led to a man being charged with the murder of a 6-year-old boy, saying the police needed a search warrant. A court in Washington compared text messages to voice mail messages that can be overheard by anyone in a room and are therefore not protected by state privacy laws.

In Louisiana, a federal appeals court is weighing whether location records stored in smartphones deserve privacy protection, or whether they are “business records” that belong to the phone companies.

“The courts are all over the place,” said Hanni Fakhoury, a criminal lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a San Francisco-based civil liberties group. “They can’t even agree if there’s a reasonable expectation of privacy in text messages that would trigger Fourth Amendment protection.”

To read the full story click here.