bestusacasinos.org rated online casino south africa best online blackjack usa players united states casino slots new us online casinos all new video slots online blackjack bonus UseMyBank and online casinos instant play casino for us players slot machines games best paying casino games 2014 bonus guide best online slots site casino forum best online casino slots us player blackjack casino real money play casino slot machine online


Get Our Newsletter


Twitter Widgets



Links

Columnists





Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

November 2012
S M T W T F S
« Oct   Dec »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for November 14th, 2012

Portland Man Pleads Guilty to Setting Wife’s FBI Car Ablaze

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 It’s safe to say David Powers was unhappy.

The 44-year-old Portland man who packed his wife’s FBI Dodge Charger with her Glock, ballistic vests, credentials and badge and then set it ablaze pleaded guilty Tuesday to destruction of federal property, the Oregonian reports.

Powers, who was hospitalized with burns to his face, hands and arms, was depressed over his marital separation when he caused the explosion that shook the couple’s garage off its foundation, prosecutors said.

Powers faces 10 years in prison when he is sentenced Feb. 22.

FBI: Reputed Conn. Mobster Was Involved in Largest Art Heist in History

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI believes a reputed Connecticut mobster who is expected to plead guilty today to weapons and prescription drugs charges was involved in the largest art heist in history, the Associated Press reports.

Although Robert Gentile, 76, hasn’t been charged in the 1990 St. Patrick’s Day heist, Assistant U.S. Attorney John Durham said the FBI suspects Gentile “had some involvement in connection with stolen property” related to the theft at Boston’s Isabella Steward Gardner Museum, the AP reported.

It’s unclear whether Gentile’s decision to plead guilty is part of a plea agreement tied to the theft of 13 pieces of art including masterpieces by Degas, Manet, Rembrandt and Vermeer that are valued at more than a half-billion dollars.

Gentile’s attorney, A. Ryan McGuigan, has maintained his client has no information on the heist, the AP wrote.

St. Patrick’s Day, tying up two guards and making off with 13 pieces of art including masterworks by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Degas and Manet worth more than a half-billion dollars.


New Surveillance Software Will Give FBI Agents Instant Information From Mobile Devices

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A $1 billion facial recognition system for the FBI will allow agents to capture photos, fingerprints, iris scans and other biographical data from a mobile device such as a phone, Computer World reports.

The new technology is part of the Biometric Identification Tools Program, surveillance software that relies on biometric data and is expected to be unleashed in 2014.

The software is the latest effort to help agents track down elusive criminals, especially terrorists.

It’s designed to determine identities through tattoos, palm prints and eye scans.

Opinion: Former Justice Dept. Spokesman Says FBI handled Petraeus Investigation Properly

Matthew Miller is a partner at Vianovo. From 2009 to 2011, he was the Director of the Office of Public Affairs at the Department of Justice.

By Matthew Miller
Politico
 
Since the news of CIA Director David Petraeus’s extramarital affair with his biographer Paula Broadwell broke last week, members of Congress have demanded to know why they weren’t informed of the relationship sooner. Some, including House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), have also insisted that the Department of Justice had an obligation to inform the president.

“Who knew what, when?” has become such a familiar talking point in Washington, that it rolls off the tongue anytime a new scandal breaks. But the desire for those in Congress, and even others on the president’s national security team, to be instantly briefed on ongoing FBI investigations conflicts with the longstanding rules governing criminal inquiries, which specify a much more narrow distribution of information. Those rules exist to protect both the integrity of investigations themselves and the reputations of people who become implicated in them, many of whom are never charged with a crime.

To read more click here.

Drunk Man Accused of Threatening Family Members of an FBI Agent

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

There’s an old, time-tested rule: Don’t make phone calls while you’re really inebriated.

Peter Joseph Persico apparently couldn’t help himself at a Florida bar when he called the FBI office in Albany and unleashed a torrent of profanity directed at an agent, the Albany Times Union reports.

Still fuming after he was indicted on cyberstalking charges stemming from tormenting a woman in Montgomery County in New York, Persico is accused of telling a federal agent over the phone, “Tell your mom I said hi. Tell your sister I said hi, too,” the Albany Times Union reported.

Persico’s attorney on Tuesday said his client was drunk and did not mean any harm.

But Senior U.S. District Court Judge Thomas McAvoy wasn’t impressed and denied Persico’s motion to toss the charges.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST